USES TADALAFIL

Why is this medication prescribed?

Tadalafil (Cialis) is used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED, impotence; inability to get or keep an erection), and the symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; an enlarged prostate) which include difficulty urinating (hesitation, dribbling, weak stream, and incomplete bladder emptying), painful urination, and urinary frequency and urgency in adult men. Tadalafil (Adcirca) is used to improve the ability to exercise in people with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; high blood pressure in the vessels carrying blood to the lungs, causing shortness of breath, dizziness, and tiredness). Tadalafil is in a class of medications called phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors. It works to treat erectile dysfunction by increasing blood flow to the penis during sexual stimulation. This increased blood flow can cause an erection. Tadalafil treats PAH by relaxing the blood vessels in the lungs to allow blood to flow more easily.

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect more than half of older men. Options for bothersome symptoms include α- adrenergic-receptor blockers, 5α-reductase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy, and antimuscarinic therapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice article on this topic. BPH, a histologic diagnosis, is a condition that occurs with aging; the prevalence increases from 25% among men 40 to 49 years of age to more than 80% among men 70 to 79 years of age. – See more at: http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/bph/2012/07/20/#sthash.9rzScxeD.dpuf

If you are taking tadalafil to treat erectile dysfunction, you should know that it does not cure erectile dysfunction or increase sexual desire. Tadalafil does not prevent pregnancy or the spread of sexually transmitted diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect more than half of older men. Options for bothersome symptoms include α- adrenergic-receptor blockers, 5α-reductase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy, and antimuscarinic therapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice article on this topic. BPH, a histologic diagnosis, is a condition that occurs with aging; the prevalence increases from 25% among men 40 to 49 years of age to more than 80% among men 70 to 79 years of age.

Clinical Pearls

What are the lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH?

The symptoms are classified as obstructive voiding or bladder storage symptoms. Obstructive voiding symptoms include urinary hesitancy, delay in initiating micturition, intermittency, involuntary interruption of voiding, weak urinary stream, straining to void, a sensation of incomplete emptying, and terminal dribbling. Storage symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, urgency, incontinence, and bladder pain or dysuria.

What are the risk factors for developing BPH?

In addition to increased age, additional risk factors include black (vs. white) race, obesity, diabetes, high levels of alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity; mechanisms underlying these associations remain poorly understood. Physiological markers associated with an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia include levels of endogenous testosterone and dihydrotestosterone as well as increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and estradiol, insulin-like growth factors, and inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein).

– See more at: http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/bph/2012/07/20/#sthash.9rzScxeD.dpuf

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect more than half of older men. Options for bothersome symptoms include α- adrenergic-receptor blockers, 5α-reductase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy, and antimuscarinic therapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice article on this topic. BPH, a histologic diagnosis, is a condition that occurs with aging; the prevalence increases from 25% among men 40 to 49 years of age to more than 80% among men 70 to 79 years of age.

Clinical Pearls

What are the lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH?

The symptoms are classified as obstructive voiding or bladder storage symptoms. Obstructive voiding symptoms include urinary hesitancy, delay in initiating micturition, intermittency, involuntary interruption of voiding, weak urinary stream, straining to void, a sensation of incomplete emptying, and terminal dribbling. Storage symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, urgency, incontinence, and bladder pain or dysuria.

What are the risk factors for developing BPH?

In addition to increased age, additional risk factors include black (vs. white) race, obesity, diabetes, high levels of alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity; mechanisms underlying these associations remain poorly understood. Physiological markers associated with an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia include levels of endogenous testosterone and dihydrotestosterone as well as increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and estradiol, insulin-like growth factors, and inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein).

– See more at: http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/bph/2012/07/20/#sthash.9rzScxeD.dpuf

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect more than half of older men. Options for bothersome symptoms include α- adrenergic-receptor blockers, 5α-reductase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy, and antimuscarinic therapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice article on this topic. BPH, a histologic diagnosis, is a condition that occurs with aging; the prevalence increases from 25% among men 40 to 49 years of age to more than 80% among men 70 to 79 years of age.

Clinical Pearls

What are the lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH?

The symptoms are classified as obstructive voiding or bladder storage symptoms. Obstructive voiding symptoms include urinary hesitancy, delay in initiating micturition, intermittency, involuntary interruption of voiding, weak urinary stream, straining to void, a sensation of incomplete emptying, and terminal dribbling. Storage symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, urgency, incontinence, and bladder pain or dysuria.

What are the risk factors for developing BPH?

In addition to increased age, additional risk factors include black (vs. white) race, obesity, diabetes, high levels of alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity; mechanisms underlying these associations remain poorly understood. Physiological markers associated with an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia include levels of endogenous testosterone and dihydrotestosterone as well as increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and estradiol, insulin-like growth factors, and inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein).

– See more at: http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/bph/2012/07/20/#sthash.9rzScxeD.dpuf

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect more than half of older men. Options for bothersome symptoms include α- adrenergic-receptor blockers, 5α-reductase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy, and antimuscarinic therapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice article on this topic. BPH, a histologic diagnosis, is a condition that occurs with aging; the prevalence increases from 25% among men 40 to 49 years of age to more than 80% among men 70 to 79 years of age.

Clinical Pearls

What are the lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH?

The symptoms are classified as obstructive voiding or bladder storage symptoms. Obstructive voiding symptoms include urinary hesitancy, delay in initiating micturition, intermittency, involuntary interruption of voiding, weak urinary stream, straining to void, a sensation of incomplete emptying, and terminal dribbling. Storage symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, urgency, incontinence, and bladder pain or dysuria.

What are the risk factors for developing BPH?

In addition to increased age, additional risk factors include black (vs. white) race, obesity, diabetes, high levels of alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity; mechanisms underlying these associations remain poorly understood. Physiological markers associated with an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia include levels of endogenous testosterone and dihydrotestosterone as well as increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and estradiol, insulin-like growth factors, and inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein).

– See more at: http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/bph/2012/07/20/#sthash.9rzScxeD.dpuf

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect more than half of older men. Options for bothersome symptoms include α- adrenergic-receptor blockers, 5α-reductase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy, and antimuscarinic therapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice article on this topic. BPH, a histologic diagnosis, is a condition that occurs with aging; the prevalence increases from 25% among men 40 to 49 years of age to more than 80% among men 70 to 79 years of age.

Clinical Pearls

What are the lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH?

The symptoms are classified as obstructive voiding or bladder storage symptoms. Obstructive voiding symptoms include urinary hesitancy, delay in initiating micturition, intermittency, involuntary interruption of voiding, weak urinary stream, straining to void, a sensation of incomplete emptying, and terminal dribbling. Storage symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, urgency, incontinence, and bladder pain or dysuria.

What are the risk factors for developing BPH?

In addition to increased age, additional risk factors include black (vs. white) race, obesity, diabetes, high levels of alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity; mechanisms underlying these associations remain poorly understood. Physiological markers associated with an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia include levels of endogenous testosterone and dihydrotestosterone as well as increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and estradiol, insulin-like growth factors, and inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein).

– See more at: http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/bph/2012/07/20/#sthash.9rzScxeD.dpuf

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect more than half of older men. Options for bothersome symptoms include α- adrenergic-receptor blockers, 5α-reductase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy, and antimuscarinic therapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice article on this topic. BPH, a histologic diagnosis, is a condition that occurs with aging; the prevalence increases from 25% among men 40 to 49 years of age to more than 80% among men 70 to 79 years of age.

Clinical Pearls

What are the lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH?

The symptoms are classified as obstructive voiding or bladder storage symptoms. Obstructive voiding symptoms include urinary hesitancy, delay in initiating micturition, intermittency, involuntary interruption of voiding, weak urinary stream, straining to void, a sensation of incomplete emptying, and terminal dribbling. Storage symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, urgency, incontinence, and bladder pain or dysuria.

What are the risk factors for developing BPH?

In addition to increased age, additional risk factors include black (vs. white) race, obesity, diabetes, high levels of alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity; mechanisms underlying these associations remain poorly understood. Physiological markers associated with an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia include levels of endogenous testosterone and dihydrotestosterone as well as increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and estradiol, insulin-like growth factors, and inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein).

– See more at: http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/bph/2012/07/20/#sthash.9rzScxeD.dpuf

Lower urinary tract symptoms affect more than half of older men. Options for bothersome symptoms include α- adrenergic-receptor blockers, 5α-reductase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy, and antimuscarinic therapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice article on this topic. BPH, a histologic diagnosis, is a condition that occurs with aging; the prevalence increases from 25% among men 40 to 49 years of age to more than 80% among men 70 to 79 years of age.

Clinical Pearls

What are the lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH?

The symptoms are classified as obstructive voiding or bladder storage symptoms. Obstructive voiding symptoms include urinary hesitancy, delay in initiating micturition, intermittency, involuntary interruption of voiding, weak urinary stream, straining to void, a sensation of incomplete emptying, and terminal dribbling. Storage symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, urgency, incontinence, and bladder pain or dysuria.

What are the risk factors for developing BPH?

In addition to increased age, additional risk factors include black (vs. white) race, obesity, diabetes, high levels of alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity; mechanisms underlying these associations remain poorly understood. Physiological markers associated with an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia include levels of endogenous testosterone and dihydrotestosterone as well as increased levels of dehydroepiandrosterone and estradiol, insulin-like growth factors, and inflammatory markers (e.g., C-reactive protein).

– See more at: http://blogs.nejm.org/now/index.php/bph/2012/07/20/#sthash.9rzScxeD.dpuf

Tadalafil Fron Cipla Ltd. is indicated for the treatment of men with erectile dysfunction (ED), men with the signs and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)